sign up

Join my mailing list and I'll give you my new single

No spam, no selling your addresses.
Promise.

Nan Kemberling writes very compelling lyrics! Combine that with well crafted melodies and interesting song forms that borrow from the classical as well as the pop vernaculars and you have a recipe for a very cool listening experience. ”

— J. Michael Duff, Musical Director/Conductor/Composer/ASCAP

About Nan

Nan Kemberling is a freelance cellist in Atlanta whose work takes her anywhere from playing Broadway shows to opening for country star Brett Eldredge to collaborating with hip hop legend Jermaine Dupri for the Atlanta Falcons.

Because of this wide variety of daily influences, her music can't be confined to one genre. Ranging from Symphonic Metal to Bubblegum Pop to Dark Cabaret, her songs often touch on themes of love and death - often within one song.

photo: Cameron Adams

photo: Cameron Adams

Rich Inner Life album

COMING SOON!

Nan previously fronted an electronica band, Pink Pompeii, which was named after one of her original songs about a not-so-natural disaster. With Pink Pompeii, she created two albums, De Rigueur (2010) and Pomp (2012). 

Nan’s debut solo album, Rich Inner Life, finally presents Pink Pompeii, the song, which could masquerade as a fun-loving theme for a kid’s show. A pair of dark love ballads, Lobotomy and Dahmer, bookend the album, while lighter fare dealing with aging, divorce, death, and the meaning of life are sandwiched in between. Even the hook of the only straight-up rock song of the album is taken from a Gregorian chant tune that is typically used in classical music to signify impending doom. 

Some of these songs are so personal that they were never a good fit for her other projects. Others songs were just too weird. Some of these songs have been languishing without public expression for almost 20 years.  After three years of recording and tweaking, the twelve misfit songs of Rich Inner Life are finally about to emerge. 

Still not sure what the album is like? Well, imagine if Dresden Dolls and They Might Be Giants got together to play in a cello choir while Regina Spektor crashed their rehearsal and added alternating vocal impressions of Disney princesses and villains. 

That’s the sound of Rich Inner Life. It’s dark, playful, and quirky, driven by imaginative lyrics and whiplash-inducing changes in style.